Black History

African-American History Trivia Challenge

1. The name of the “Negro hotel” on Capitol Hill 1890s, which was featured in W.E.B. Du Bois’ Paris Exhibition of Black uplift and respectability? A) The Johnson Inn, B) The Southern Hotel, C) The Cloister Tavern and Hotel, D) The Amistad

[bg_collapse view=”link” color=”#4a4949″ expand_text=”Answer” collapse_text=”- Collapse” ]B. The Southern Hotel, (picture on the left in photo) was a hotel for African-Americans which was situated at 311 Pennsylvania Avenue, Northwest. The photograph was taken around 1899.[/bg_collapse]

 

2. Which elementary school in D.C. was named for the first African-American appointed to the Board of Trustees for Colored Schools in 1862? A) Garnett Patterson, B) C.W. Harris, C) William Syphax, D) John Eaton

[bg_collapse view=”link” color=”#4a4949″ expand_text=”Answer” collapse_text=”- Collapse” ]C. William Syphax was the first African American appointed to the Board of Trustees for Colored Schools in the city, which was established after emancipation in DC during 1862. He served on the board from 1868 to 1871 as its chairman and later, the treasurer. Syphax was a proponent of a unified public school system, and a vigorous advocate for equal educational standards. He oversaw construction of the Sumner, Lincoln, and Stevens Schools (the first African American schools considered equally designed to those built for white students). During his tenure, DC also saw a significant increase of African American educators.[/bg_collapse]

 

3. Mary McLeod Bethune spearheaded the NCNW from which building that would later become a National Historic Site location? A) The Council House, B) Rittenhouse C) The Dorchester, D) The Mayflower

[bg_collapse view=”link” color=”#4a4949″ expand_text=”Answer” collapse_text=”- Collapse” ]ANSWER: A. The Council House was the first headquarters of the National Council of Negro Women (NCNW) and was Bethune’s last home in Washington, DC. From here, Bethune and the NCNW spearheaded strategies and developed programs that advanced the interests of African American women.[/bg_collapse]

 

4. Which area of the District was the site of a 1949 race riot that occurred when white mobs attacked Black children at a newly integrated swimming pool? A) Capitol Hill, B) Friendship Heights, C) Georgetown, D) Anacostia

[bg_collapse view=”link” color=”#4a4949″ expand_text=”Answer” collapse_text=”- Collapse” ]D. Anacostia. The racial violence at Anacostia Pool took place on June 29, 1949, at a recently-desegregated public swimming pool in the Anacostia neighborhood of Washington, D.C. After two days of Black children and teens being harassed, beaten and chased from the pool by whites armed with sticks and bats, a two-hour large-scale disturbance involving 450 people resulted in five arrests and at least four serious injuries. By August 16, 1949, a group of 25 mothers – both Black and white — came forward to ask that the pool be reopened. They demanded for the non-segregation policy of the federal government to continue to be enforced at the pool by trained police officers, both black and white. The pool was reopened by the Department of the Interior as an integrated facility in summer 1950, with an increased police presence. No further disturbances occurred as whites decided to leave the pool rather than swim with Blacks.[/bg_collapse]

 

5. In 1984, who was crowned the first African-American Miss D.C.? A) Michelle Coleman, B) Desiree Keating, C) Priscilla Walker, D) Sonya Addison

[bg_collapse view=”link” color=”#4a4949″ expand_text=”Answer” collapse_text=”- Collapse” ]ANSWER: B. Desiree Keating.[/bg_collapse]

 

6. The first African American U.S. senator, Hiram R. Revels, held from which state? A) Mississippi, B) Georgia, C) Vermont, D) Pennsylvania

[bg_collapse view=”link” color=”#4a4949″ expand_text=”Answer” collapse_text=”- Collapse” ]A. Mississippi. A freeman his entire life, Hiram Rhodes Revels was the first African American to serve in the U.S. Congress. With his moderate political orientation and oratorical skills honed from years as a preacher, Revels filled a vacant seat in the United States Senate in 1870. Black legislators agreed to the deal, believing, as Revels recalled, that an election of one of their own would “be a weakening blow against color line prejudice.” The Democratic minority also endorsed the plan, hoping a black Senator would “seriously damage the Republican Party.”13 After three days and seven ballots, on January 20, 1870, the Mississippi state legislature voted 85 to 15 to seat Hiram Revels in Brown’s former seat. They chose Union General Adelbert Ames to fill Jefferson Davis’ former seat.[/bg_collapse]

 

7. What New Orleans bluesman traveled to D.C. to record more than nine hours of music for the Library of Congress and discuss such compositions as “King Porter Stomp” and “Wolverine Blues”? A) Bo Diddley, B) Bubber Miley, C) Jelly Roll Morton, D) Fletcher Henderson

[bg_collapse view=”link” color=”#4a4949″ expand_text=”Answer” collapse_text=”- Collapse” ]C. Jelly Roll Morton. In 1938, three years before his death, Morton sat at the keys in Coolidge Auditorium at the Library of Congress and gave the story of his life, the birth of jazz and life in New Orleans to Alan Lomax. The entire (sharply edited) recording was released under the title, Jelly Roll Morton: The Complete Library of Congress Recordings by Alan Lomax.[/bg_collapse]

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