This April 12, 2011 electron microscope image made available by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases shows an H9 T cell, blue, infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), yellow. (AP Photo/NIAID)
This April 12, 2011 electron microscope image made available by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases shows an H9 T cell, blue, infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), yellow. (AP Photo/NIAID)

(Pierce Pioneer) – In the world growing industry of HIV treatment, research now indicates that a new strategy could starve the virus by stopping its supply of sugar and nutrient channels.

“The discovery opens new avenues for further research to solve today’s persisting problems in treating HIV infection: avoiding virus resistance to medicines, decreasing the inflammation that leads to premature aging and maybe even one day being able to cure HIV infection,” explains Dr. Richard D’Aquila from the Northwestern University HIV Translational Research Center.

Basically, the research has identified the “switch” in the body which produces more sugar and nutrients for that particular HIV pipeline; and, furthermore, the study has indicated that it is possible to shut off this switch. Generally, the HIV virus invades the cell and gets to right to work with replication.

HIV growth depends on the invasion of a very specific type of immune cell—the CD4-T-Cell).

READ MORE

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Yes, I would like to receive emails from Washington Informer Newspaper. Sign me up!


By submitting this form, you are consenting to receive marketing emails from: Washington Informer Newspaper, 3117 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave SE, Washington, DC, 20032, https://www.washingtoninformer.com. You can revoke your consent to receive emails at any time by using the SafeUnsubscribe® link, found at the bottom of every email. Emails are serviced by Constant Contact