(AP Photo)
(AP Photo)
(AP Photo)

(New York Times) – Ana Navas-Acien can’t quite recall the moment when she began to worry about arsenic in drinking water and its potential role in heart disease.

Perhaps it was when she read a study suggesting a link among people in Bangladesh.

And a similar study in Taiwan. And in Chile.

Several years ago, Dr. Navas-Acien, an associate professor of epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, decided to see if similar links could be found in the United States.

She found an ideal group — a stable population relying mainly on private well water — in an ongoing study of Native Americans in the Dakotas and the Southwest. Known as the Strong Heart Study, the project had tracked the lifestyles and environmental exposures of more than 4,000 people since the late 1980s.

READ MORE

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.

Yes, I would like to receive emails from Washington Informer Newspaper. Sign me up!


By submitting this form, you are consenting to receive marketing emails from: Washington Informer Newspaper, 3117 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave SE, Washington, DC, 20032, https://www.washingtoninformer.com. You can revoke your consent to receive emails at any time by using the SafeUnsubscribe® link, found at the bottom of every email. Emails are serviced by Constant Contact