A hologram of the late George Floyd shines at the Robert E. Lee statue on Monument Avenue, where hundreds of people joined Floyd's family for the unveiling. the memorial project, sponsored by Change.org and the George Floyd Foundation, will be on display in Richmond through Aug. 6, 2020. (Sandra Sellars/Richmond Free Press via Trice Edney News Wire)
**FILE** A hologram of the late George Floyd shines at the Robert E. Lee statue on Monument Avenue, where hundreds of people joined Floyd's family for the unveiling. the memorial project, sponsored by Change.org and the George Floyd Foundation, will be on display in Richmond through Aug. 6, 2020. (Sandra Sellars/Richmond Free Press via Trice Edney News Wire)

On the first anniversary of the police murder of George Floyd, President Joe Biden invited the slain Black man’s family to the White House.

At the time, Biden expressed optimism that the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act would become law, but that didn’t happen.

This year, on the second anniversary, Biden plans to issue an executive order on police reform, which administration officials said would establish new rules for the use of force by federal law enforcement officers.

“It’s an effort to be responsive,” administration officials said.

The order likely would mimic California’s police reform law, which requires that new police officers in the state be at least 21 years old. That law also allows for the discipline of officers who fail to intervene when another law enforcement member uses excessive force.

The statute place firm limits on when officers are allowed to use deadly force, noting that such actions only are permitted when necessary to defend human life.

Previously, officers could use deadly force if they deemed it “reasonable.”

Following the murder conviction of former Minneapolis Police Officer Derek Chauvin, three other officers were found guilty in federal court of violating Floyd’s civil rights.

Prosecutors said the trio stood by while Chauvin pressed his knee into the unarmed 46-year-old man’s neck for more than nine minutes.

Thomas Lane recently agreed to a plea deal to avoid state prosecution and serve two years in prison. The other two officers involved, J. Alexander Kueng and Tou Thao, face a state trial this summer.

“I am pleased Thomas Lane has accepted responsibility for his role in Floyd’s death,” said Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison. “His acknowledgment that he did something wrong is an important step toward healing the wounds of the Floyd family, our community, and the nation. While accountability is not justice, this is a significant moment in this case and a necessary resolution on our continued journey to justice.”

Stacy M. Brown is a senior writer for The Washington Informer and the senior national correspondent for the Black Press of America. Stacy has more than 25 years of journalism experience and has authored...

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