Black DMV Homeowners Ban Together; Build Equity Through ‘Ownership Matters’ Group
Ownership Matters, a collective for Black homeowners, gather for an annual photoshoot in front of Fredrick Douglass’s historic Southeast D.C. home on Juneteenth. Photo by Gregory Jackson

Our House D.C. 5.9.22

Building Equity Through ‘Ownership Matters’ Group

Ownership Matters, based in the District since 2018, works to build a community of Black homeowners, landowners, and business owners across the U.S., sharing lessons, challenges and resources through virtual platforms including GroupMe, Clubhouse and Instagram. “About 150 folks came together in front of Fredrick Douglass’ house [to] take a big group photo,” said Gregory Jackson, founder of Ownership Matters, referring to a celebration which started before the pandemic and continues for its fourth year. When COVID hit, a lot of the in-person stuff we had planned was derailed.” https://conta.cc/3kUiQsr

Our House D.C. 4.25.22

Defining Generational Wealth

Despite Aretha Franklin having specific and predetermined outfit changes during her homegoing ceremony, the Queen of Soul made no similar plans when it came to having a will. And while it’s evident that most Americans don’t possess the financial assets that these celebrities enjoyed, when it comes to passing down assets, most Black people have not implemented the appropriate strategies to secure and preserve generational wealth. “It’s not even just leaving something behind for our progeny,” explained Jasmine Tyler, professor of the practice at the McCourt School of Public Policy at Georgetown University. https://conta.cc/3vGc3Hx

Our House D.C. 4.11.22

Mortgage Lending Disparities Limit the Rate of Black homeownership in D.C.

The road to financial power and prosperity is paved with homeownership. Nationally, over 70% of Black wealth is tied to homeownership. In 2020, after the death of George Floyd, protests fostered conversations around the connections between issues of policing and economics, education, housing, and equity. Americans demanded that the institutions with which they spent money go on record with their commitment to racial justice. Unfortunately, two years later, these investments have done little to move the needle upward for the rate of homeownership for Black Americans and Black residents of the District. https://conta.cc/377ofco

Our House D.C. 3.28.22

Community Conversation with the D.C. Office of Tax and Revenue

The D.C. Office of Tax and Revenue (OTR) and The Washington Informer led a virtual community conversation to inform D.C. homeowners about property tax assessments and assistance ahead of the tax payment due date on March 31. In mid-February, the agency mailed nearly 250,000 real property tax assessments for 2022 to District residents, followed by real property tax bills sent in early March. The virtual forum that lasted more than an hour included participants’ questions focusing on issues related to their property tax bills, including the process for calculating tax assessments. https://conta.cc/3GaubOB

Our House D.C. 12.6.21

The Impact Of COVID-19 On Black Homeownership In The District

In December 2021, just under 800,000 Americans had died from COVID-19 and a new variant, Omicron, which was arriving on American shores. Throughout the District, breakfast, lunch, and dinner tables have empty chairs, each representing loved ones who died prematurely due to COVID-19. Mothers and fathers are attending parent-teacher conferences, but now as single parents. Children grow up without their grandparents and some, without mothers or fathers. Favorite teachers are no longer with us. Even children are victims of the pandemic. Yet, the holiday season also represented one of hope. https://conta.cc/3DqsSs6

Update: Elderly Woman May Lose Home Owned by Family for Almost 100 Years
Our House D.C. 11.2.21 Update: Elderly Woman May Lose Home Owned by Family for Almost 100 Years The Impact Of COVID-19 On Black Homeownership In The District In December 2021, just under 800,000 Americans had died from COVID-19 and a new variant, Omicron, which was arriving on American shores. Throughout the District, breakfast, lunch, and dinner tables have empty chairs, each representing loved ones who died prematurely due to COVID-19. Mothers and fathers are attending parent-teacher conferences, but now as single parents. Children grow up without their grandparents and some, without mothers or fathers. Favorite teachers are no longer with us. Even children are victims of the pandemic. Yet, the holiday season also represented one of hope. https://conta.cc/3DqsSs6

Our House D.C. 10.25.21

Elderly Woman May Lose Home Owned by Family for Almost 100 Years

This article explored the challenges of District homeowners who find their homes designated as blighted properties and on the auction block for sale due to unpaid property taxes. Mildred Chappelle, 97-years old, was, profiled. The property at 4304 Jay Street, NE, in Washington, D.C., has been owned by the Chappelle family for 96 years. The home was purchased by Mildred Chappelle’s parents, Belton and Janie Chappelle, on June 20, 1925. Chappelle was raised in this home along with her brothers, Stanley and Edward, and sister Gladys. What if this happens to you? https://conta.cc/3GgaEfz

Our House D.C. 10.11.21

The Latest: Black Homeownership On the Rise in D.C.’s Wards 7 & 8. How long will it last?

Kimberly Cataundella with the Center for Public Integrity (CPI) examined the root causes of the increase in Black homeownership in Wards 7 and 8 and the subsequent decrease in Wards 1 and 4. In her story, hear Albert J. Wilson, Jr. who resides in Northeast and is the primary caregiver for his mother, offered his reflections on both his pride and the challenges of Black homeownership in the nation’s capital. “The biggest thing I’m seeing is how little Black community there is anymore,” Wilson said. https://conta.cc/3Dnc4Co

Our House D.C. 9.27.21

Homeowners’ Dreams Deferred on Talbot Street

Southeast Brittany Bennett and her sons lived in a shelter. She often dreamed of purchasing a home, she also spent many sleepless nights wondering how her dream could become a reality. So, as she said, she held on to her dream and began to search for ways that would allow her to begin building “generational wealth.” she would discover that help was available from the District and took full advantage of it. Unfortunately, Brittany, like others at Grandview Estates, overcame homelessness only to be confronted with multiple safety concerns in their “dream homes.” https://conta.cc/3m1xuy0

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