The city of Cleveland will pay Tamir Rice’s family $6 million in a wrongful death suit following the boy’s shooting death in 2014. The settlement, which was announced Monday morning, will be paid out in two separate sums of $3 million — one in 2016 and one in 2017.

The lawsuit was filed against the city and the two officers involved in 12-year-old Rice’s death, Timothy Loehmann and Frank Garmback. In November of 2014, the officers responded to a 911 call about a boy with a gun at a rec center. The caller identified that the gun was “probably a fake.” But when the officers arrived on the scene, Loehmann, who was a rookie at the time, waited less than four seconds before exiting his police cruiser and gunning Rice down. Rice died the following day.

A grand jury declined to press charges against either one of the officers. As reported by Clevescene, the settlement states, “There is no admission of wrongdoing, and all plaintiffs will execute full releases against the City of Cleveland and all individual defendants.”

Clevescene, the settlement states, “There is no admission of wrongdoing, and all plaintiffs will execute full releases against the City of Cleveland and all individual defendants.”

According to Cleveland.com, the federal lawsuit looked at more than just the actions of the police officers specifically and “called into question the actions of the dispatchers who first put out the call about a disturbance at Cudell.”

Cleveland.com, the federal lawsuit looked at more than just the actions of the police officers specifically and “called into question the actions of the dispatchers who first put out the call about a disturbance at Cudell.”

A county judge must approve the terms of the settlement before it is finalized.

While lawyers for Rice’s estate reported that “no amount of money can adequately compensate” the emotional trauma sustained by the Rice family, the settlement brings to an end this portion of legal proceedings.

“In a situation like this, there’s no such thing as closure or justice,” lawyers Johnathan Abady and Earl Ward said in a statement Monday. “Nothing will bring Tamir back. His unnecessary and premature death leaves a gaping hole for those who knew and loved him that can never be filled.”

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.