Sports

Earl Lloyd, First Black Player in NBA, Dies at 86

In this April 1955 file photo, Fort Wayne's Mel Hutchins (9) and Syracuse's Earl Lloyd (11) reach for the ball during an NBA basketball game in Indianapolis. Lloyd, the first black player in NBA history, died Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015. He was 86. Lloyd's alma mater, West Virginia State, confirmed the death. It did not provide details. Lloyd made his NBA debut in 1950 for the Washington Capitals, just before fellow black players Sweetwater Clifton and Chuck Cooper played their first games. (AP Photo/File)
In this April 1955 file photo, Fort Wayne’s Mel Hutchins (9) and Syracuse’s Earl Lloyd (11) reach for the ball during an NBA basketball game in Indianapolis. Lloyd, the first black player in NBA history, died Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015. He was 86. Lloyd’s alma mater, West Virginia State, confirmed the death. It did not provide details. Lloyd made his NBA debut in 1950 for the Washington Capitals, just before fellow black players Sweetwater Clifton and Chuck Cooper played their first games. (AP Photo/File)

The Associated Press

Earl Lloyd, the first black player in NBA history, died Thursday. He was 86.

Lloyd’s alma mater, West Virginia State, confirmed the death. It did not provide details.

Lloyd made his NBA debut in 1950 for the Washington Capitals, just before fellow black players Sweetwater Clifton and Chuck Cooper played their first games.

“The NBA family has lost one of its patriarchs,” NBA Commissioner Adam Silver said in a statement. “Earl Lloyd, the first African-American to play in an NBA game, was as inspirational as he was understated. He was known as a modest gentleman who played the game with skill, class, and pride. His legacy survives in the league he helped integrate, and the entire NBA family will strive to always honor his memory.”

Lloyd helped the Syracuse Nationals win the 1955 NBA title, joining teammate Jim Tucker as the first black players to play on a championship team.

The 6-foot-5 forward averaged 8.4 points and 6.4 rebounds in 560 regular-season games in nine seasons with Washington, Syracuse and Detroit. He missed the 1951-52 season while serving in the U.S. Army.

Inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame in 2003 as a contributor, Lloyd was 22-55 as Detroit’s coach in 1971-72 and the first nine games in the 1972-73 season.

“The State family mourns the loss of a fellow Yellow Jacket and trailblazer who was a true champion both on and off of the basketball court,” West Virginia State President Brian Hemphill said in a statement. “When Earl stepped out on the court on that fateful date in 1950, this remarkable man rightfully earned his place in the historic civil rights movement and, more important, he opened the door to equality in America.”

Lloyd, a native of Alexandria, Virginia, lived in Crossville, Tennessee.

Copyright 2015 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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