Business

Economy Likely Showed Strength At The End of 2013

In this Thursday, Oct. 10, 2013, file photo, employees at Sheffield Platers Inc. work on the factory floor in San Diego. The Commerce Department releases fourth-quarter gross domestic product on Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014 (AP Photo/Lenny Ignelzi, File)
In this Thursday, Oct. 10, 2013, file photo, employees at Sheffield Platers Inc. work on the factory floor in San Diego. The Commerce Department releases fourth-quarter gross domestic product on Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014 (AP Photo/Lenny Ignelzi, File)

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy likely grew solidly in the final quarter of 2013, momentum that’s expected to carry into this year. Most economists think 2014 will produce the strongest growth since the recession officially ended in June 2009.

On Thursday, the government will make its first of three estimates of economic growth for the October-December quarter. Economists are forecasting an annual growth rate of 3.3 percent, after an even stronger 4.1 percent rate for July through September.

For all of 2013, analysts think the economy grew about 1.9 percent. That would be below the 2.8 percent growth for 2012 as measured by the gross domestic product. GDP represents the country’s total output of goods and services.

For all of 2014, analysts are more optimistic. Many foresee GDP growth of 3 percent or better.

A key reason for their optimism is an improved outlook for the government sector. Overall growth was reduced by an estimated 1.5 percentage points in 2013 because of a drag from higher federal taxes and deep government spending cuts. Those effects are expected to subside in 2014.

This year, economists also think the economy will get a lift from continued gains in hiring. Further steady job growth would give more households money to spend and help lift consumer spending, which accounts for about 70 percent of economic activity.

In addition, U.S. manufacturers are expected to get a lift from rising global demand. And at home, housing construction and auto sales, which showed strength last year, are expected to register further gains in 2014.

Because of the stronger growth prospects, the Federal Reserve on Wednesday announced that it would continue to reduce the monthly bond purchases it’s been making to try to boost the economy.

The Fed bought $85 billion a month in bonds last year to try to keep long-term interest rates low. It announced an initial $10 billion reduction in December. And after its meeting Wednesday, it announced another $10 billion cut. That will put its monthly purchases at $65 billion.

Many analysts think the Fed will keep paring its support at each of its meetings this year until it eliminates new bond purchases entirely in December.

In making the announcement, the Fed cited an improving economy, including more strength in consumer and business spending.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Tags
Show More

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


By submitting this form, you are consenting to receive marketing emails from: Washington Informer Newspaper, 3117 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave SE, Washington, DC, 20032, http://www.washingtoninformer.com. You can revoke your consent to receive emails at any time by using the SafeUnsubscribe® link, found at the bottom of every email. Emails are serviced by Constant Contact

Back to top button

My News Matters to me - Washington Informer Donations

Be a Part of The Washington Informer Legacy

A donation of your choice empowers our journalists to continue the work to better inform, educate and empower you through technology and resources that you use.

Click Here Today to Support Black Press and be a part of the Legacy!

Subscribe today for free and be the first to have news and information delivered directly to your inbox.


By submitting this form, you are consenting to receive marketing emails from: Washington Informer Newspaper, 3117 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave SE, Washington, DC, 20032, http://www.washingtoninformer.com. You can revoke your consent to receive emails at any time by using the SafeUnsubscribe® link, found at the bottom of every email. Emails are serviced by Constant Contact
Close

Adblock Detected

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker