Tenants at the Woodner Apartments in northwest D.C. protest evictions during the COVID-19 pandemic. (Courtesy photo via Facebook)
Tenants at the Woodner Apartments in northwest D.C. protest evictions during the COVID-19 pandemic. (Courtesy photo via Facebook)

So far, more than 1,200 residents from all eight wards in D.C. have met with Empower DC, the citywide grassroots coalition to halt displacement in the city of Black and brown DC residents, require the building of low-income housing and promote community-led equitable development.

Other future coalition-led gatherings will be to discuss proposed changes to the Comprehensive Plan as well as to:

• stop displacement of Black and brown residents, over 40,0000 of whom were displaced between 2000-2010 alone.

• increase the development of housing that is affordable to low-income residents (30% AMI and below).

• utilize non-market based strategies to achieve affordable housing goals.

• create opportunities for resident-led equitable development.

Starting with the mayor’s proposed changes to the over 1,000-page document, the Comp Plan has been vigorously debated in marathon council hearings and with council members. The draft comes up for Council markup on Tuesday and an expected first reading Tuesday, May 4.

WI Guest Author

This correspondent is a guest contributor to The Washington Informer.

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