Technology

Hackers Leak Sony Passwords, Social Security Numbers and Salaries

Sony Corp. President and Chief Executive Officer Kazuo Hirai speaks during a press conference at the Sony headquarters in Tokyo, Thursday, May 22, 2014. Hirai is acknowledging the company racked up losses and will stay in the red this fiscal year mainly because it failed to act quickly, but promised to carry out reforms - once and for all. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi)
Sony Corp. President and Chief Executive Officer Kazuo Hirai speaks during a press conference at the Sony headquarters in Tokyo, Thursday, May 22, 2014. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi)

(Engadget) – The cyber attack against Sony Pictures continues to be a major problem for the company. For one, it looks like the hackers used malware called Destover (which security firms believe could have been created in Korea) that can completely disable hard drives, rendering computers useless. Worse, the hackers calling themselves the Guardians of Peace recently leaked more info: a whole folder full of company passwords, as well as former and current employees’ salaries and social security numbers. And yet, all these could’ve been avoided, according to some of the company’s former employees. They told Fusion that “Sony’s ‘information security’ team is a complete joke,” prone to ignoring reports about vulnerabilities.

However, it’s unclear if the company could’ve done anything to prevent the recent security breaches, though. Aside from the fact that the GoP claimed to have physical access to Sony’s offices, the malware they used is so powerful, the FBI had to issue a flash warning to US businesses right after Thanksgiving. While the FBI’s bulletin didn’t mention specifics, security firms Trend Micro and Kaspersky have just confirmed that it’s about the same malware that took down Sony’s computers. Kaspersky has also noted that Destover works just like older malware used for previous cyber attacks against companies in Saudi and South Korea. Further, the firm has determined that its Destover samples were created on a computer using the Korean language during working hours in the peninsula.

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