National

It’s Incredibly Rare For A Grand Jury To Do What Ferguson’s Just Did

Ferguson, Mo., protesters leave arm-in-arm after being released from jail Friday. Protesters have been a constant presence in the St. Louis suburb in the nearly two months since Michael Brown was shot and killed by a police officer. A federal judge on Monday issued a preliminary injunction halting a police practice of requiring protesters to keep moving rather than stand. (Robert Cohen/AP Photo)
Ferguson, Mo., protesters leave arm-in-arm after being released from jail Friday. Protesters have been a constant presence in the St. Louis suburb in the nearly two months since Michael Brown was shot and killed by a police officer. (Robert Cohen/AP Photo)

 

(FiveThirtyEight) – A St. Louis County grand jury on Monday decided not to indict Ferguson, Missouri, police officer Darren Wilson in the August killing of teenager Michael Brown. The decision wasn’t a surprise — leaks from the grand jury had led most observers to conclude an indictment was unlikely — but it was unusual. Grand juries nearly always decide to indict.

Or at least, they nearly always do so in cases that don’t involve police officers.

Former New York state Chief Judge Sol Wachtler famously remarked that a prosecutor could persuade a grand jury to “indict a ham sandwich.” The data suggests he was barely exaggerating: According to the Bureau of Justice Statistics, U.S. attorneys prosecuted 162,000 federal cases in 2010, the most recent year for which we have data. Grand juries declined to return an indictment in 11 of them.

Wilson’s case was heard in state court, not federal, so the numbers aren’t directly comparable. Unlike in federal court, most states, including Missouri, allow prosecutors to bring charges via a preliminary hearing in front of a judge instead of through a grand jury indictment. That means many routine cases never go before a grand jury. Still, legal experts agree that, at any level, it is extremely rare for prosecutors to fail to win an indictment.

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