Entertainment

Jury Resumes Deliberations in ‘Blurred Lines’ Copyright Case

Robin Thicke leaves Los Angeles Federal Court in Los Angeles, Wednesday, March 4, 2015. The Grammy-winning singer Pharrell Williams says he wasn't trying to copy the late Marvin Gaye's music for the hit song "Blurred Lines," but he was trying to evoke the feeling of late 1970s tunes. Williams is being sued by Gaye's children, who claim "Blurred Lines" improperly copies their father's hit "Got to Give it Up." The singer Thicke and rapper T.I. are also defendants in the case. (AP Photo/Nick Ut)
Robin Thicke leaves Los Angeles Federal Court in Los Angeles, Wednesday, March 4, 2015. The Grammy-winning singer Pharrell Williams says he wasn’t trying to copy the late Marvin Gaye’s music for the hit song “Blurred Lines,” but he was trying to evoke the feeling of late 1970s tunes. Williams is being sued by Gaye’s children, who claim “Blurred Lines” improperly copies their father’s hit “Got to Give it Up.” The singer Thicke and rapper T.I. are also defendants in the case. (AP Photo/Nick Ut)

 

LOS ANGELES (AP) — A jury has resumed deliberations in a copyright infringement case in which Marvin Gaye’s family claims the 2013 hit “Blurred Lines” copied their father’s music.

The eight-person panel resumed deliberations Friday morning, one day after hearing closing arguments. Gaye’s children are suing Robin Thicke, Pharrell Williams and the rapper T.I., alleging their song copies Gaye’s 1977 hit “Got to Give It Up.”

Jurors heard from Thicke and Pharrell, who denied they copied Gaye’s song. Much of the trial focused on detailed comparisons of the two songs.

An attorney for the Gaye family told jurors they could award millions of dollars in damages if they determine “Blurred Lines” copied the earlier hit.

“Blurred Lines” was 2013’s biggest hit and earned Williams and Thicke more than $5 million apiece.

Copyright 2015 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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