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Ketcham Students Talk Black History

Students at Ketcham Elementary School in Southeast were recently queried on what Black History Month and freedom, justice and equality means to them:


Robert Rhodes, 5th grade, age 10 – “I learned about Harriet Tubman, that my school is great. Our teachers have also taught us a lot about Black people and [our culture]. We’re now working on music and dances and will go on stage later to show what we learned.”


Clifton Covington
Clifton Covington

Clifton Covington, 5th grade, age 11 – “I learned about a lot of famous Black people who protested so that Black people everywhere could have equal rights, which means fairness for all people.”

 

 

 


Tye'zaeha Garvin-Bailey
Tye’zaeha Garvin-Bailey

Tye’zaeha Garvin-Bailey, 5th grade, age 11 – “Blacks were slaves and the slave owners kept them and beat them, and when Abraham Lincoln made the Emancipation Proclamation, they were freed. Some of the freed people fought for the Union. I also learned that equality is when all are the same — no matter if you’re homeless or rich. We’re all equal because a lot of people do the same things like working and going to church. Justice is being treated right.”

 


Marvell Chambers
Marvell Chambers

Marvell Chambers, 5th grade, age 10 – “I learned that Harriet Tubman and Martin Luther King Jr. were powerful people. When Harriett Tubman escaped from being a slave, she went back to help her family and other slaves to freedom.”

 

 

 

 


Antoinette Poindexter
Antoinette Poindexter

Antoinette Poindexter, 5th grade, age 11 – “Freedom, to me, means being able to have the same rights as other people, and equality means no one else gets to be treated any differently than anyone else.”

 

 

 

 


Leah Shuler
Leah Shuler

Leah Shuler, 2nd grade, age 8 – “Black history is when we talk about the Black people who have helped stop slavery and segregation.”

 

 

 

 

 


Cameron Gardner
Cameron Gardner

Cameron Gardner, 4th grade, age 10 – “Black history is about people who have stood up for the rights of Black people and who have helped others to be free and not let others take control of people who are free.”

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Dorothy Rowley – Washington Informer Staff Writer

I knew I had to become a writer when at age nine I scribbled a note to my younger brother’s teacher saying I thought she was being too hard on him in class. Well, the teacher immediately contacted my mother, and with tears in her eyes, profusely apologized. Of course, my embarrassed mother dealt with me – but that didn’t stop me from pursuing my passion for words and writing. Nowadays, as a “semi-retiree,” I continue to work for the Washington Informer as a staff writer. Aside from that, I keep busy creating quirky videos for YouTube, participating in an actor’s guild and being part of my church’s praise dance team and adult choir. I’m a regular fixture at the gym, and I like to take long road trips that have included fun-filled treks to Miami, Florida and Jackson, Mississippi. I’m poised to take to the road again in early 2017, headed for New Orleans, Louisiana. This proud grandmother of two – who absolutely adores interior decorating – did her undergraduate studies at Virginia Union University and graduate work at Virginia State University.

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