**FILE** Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson speaks as Vice President Kamala Harris stands by, after President Joe Biden's nomination of her to serve as Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, at The White House in Washington, D.C., on Feb. 25, 2022. (Cheriss May/The Washington Informer)

As the Senate confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Ketanji Brown Jackson begin Monday, the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law released a report evaluating the judge with a recommendation for confirmation.

The organization said its report reflects a thorough review of Jackson’s record on civil rights issues of importance to the committee’s mission.

The report said that Jackson “possesses not only the exceptional competence necessary to serve on the Court, but also that she approaches legal questions with a profound respect for the importance of protecting the civil rights afforded by the Constitution and the nation’s civil rights laws.”

For these reasons, the organization proclaimed that it unequivocally supports Jackson’s nomination.

“After carefully vetting Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson’s record, it is clear that she has the extraordinary qualifications, experience, and character to serve the nation on the Supreme Court,” Damon Hewitt, president and executive director of the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, said in a statement.

“Judge Jackson is a highly skilled and meticulous jurist who will bring a welcome perspective to the high court as the first Justice with experience as a public defender, and the first since Justice Thurgood Marshall to bring significant criminal defense experience to the Court,” Hewitt said.

The report was accompanied by a letter of support signed by over 100 members of the committee’s national advisory board and its executive committee, all among the nation’s leading attorneys in the private bar, corporate and nonprofit leadership, and the legal academy.

“Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson’s remarkable record reflects a jurist who respects and follows the letter of the law while never losing sight of the practical impact of her rulings on the parties who appear before her,” said Shirlethia V. Franklin, who chaired a group of leading attorneys that served on the organization’s Supreme Court Nomination Committee.

If confirmed, Jackson would be the first Black female justice in the Supreme Court’s 232-year history.

“Her highly anticipated presence on the Court — bringing with her a breadth of experiences, sterling credentials, and a judicial philosophy that applies the law equally to all — would be a significant step forward for our democracy,” Franklin said.

Recognizing the Supreme Court’s critical role in civil rights enforcement and the central role that the Court plays in American democracy, the Lawyers’ Committee said it had long reviewed the record of nominees to the Court to determine if they demonstrate views that are consistent with the core civil rights principles for which the organization has advocated.

Like prior committee reports on Supreme Court nominees, the report on Jackson is based on her full record, including opinions she authored or joined while serving on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit and the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, her tenure on the U.S. Sentencing Commission, testimony during her three prior confirmation hearings, and her work and writings as a private attorney and a federal public defender.

View the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law report here

Stacy M. Brown is a senior writer for The Washington Informer and the senior national correspondent for the Black Press of America. Stacy has more than 25 years of journalism experience and has authored...

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  1. Mrs kentaji Brown Jackson demonstrates excellent qualifications as a judge but fails in the terms of life. An infant in a mother’s womb has the absolute right to be born. Try as she can, she can not step passed this child and allow its abortion.

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