The Prince George's Community College Dealer School, a joint effort between the college and MGM National Harbor, will train prospective employees for the soon-to-open casino on the harbor. (mgmnationalharbor.com)
The Prince George's Community College Dealer School, a joint effort between the college and MGM National Harbor, will train prospective employees for the soon-to-open casino on the harbor. (mgmnationalharbor.com)

William Reed’s Business Exchange column in The Washington Informer strikes a good balance of opinion on a lot of issues both nationally and locally. In his column “Are Blacks in Business at National Harbor and MGM?” he raises some disturbing issues. First, let me say I have read a lot of articles praising Prince George’s County for its handling of the construction of the MGM casino, touting all of the minority participation. But in Reed’s column he quotes Bruce Branch of the Prince George’s County Business and Contractor Association who says they did not get the contracts they were promised. The article goes on to say that local political leaders are left wondering if the county should have pushed for a tougher deal. If this is true, Prince George’s County has some real political problems. The article listed other construction projects in which minority contractors were left out. How many projects will it take to get things right? How many “next times” will there be? The question should be which Prince George’s County politician will have the backbone to stand up for county residents when the next construction project comes along?

James Pitts, Fort Washington, Md.

Councilman McDuffie Shows He Cares for the Poor

I applaud Ward 5 Councilman Kenyan McDuffie’s efforts to get the District to provide free legal counsel for low-income residents, especially when it comes to housing cases. Your Sept. 22 edition’s article by Sarafina Wright, “Low-Income D.C. Residents May Get Free Legal Counsel” made me feel real very proud of my councilman. There’s nothing more terrifying than to enter a courtroom knowing you are right, and then see across the room a row full of lawyers who are opposing you and who use all sorts of legal terms, making all sorts of motions that you don’t understand while all you can say is that you know you are right. It is something that should have been in place years ago, but I guess now is still better than not at all. I hope the whole council gets behind Councilman McDuffie in his push to make the legal system fairer for all.

Samuel Bennett, Washington, D.C.

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