EducationLocalWilliam J. Ford

Maryland Board of Education OKs Fall In-Person Instruction

The Maryland Board of Education unanimously approved a resolution Tuesday for the state’s public schools to begin in-person instruction for five days a week starting this fall.

During this school year, about 512,000 of the 882,000 Maryland students in pre-kindergarten through 12th grade continue to receive online instruction with their teachers and other staff from home.

“It may be a very long time before we know the true impact of the pandemic on public education,” said state Superintendent Karen Salmon. “The more education we provide, the better health outcomes we experience as adults.”

The resolution notes that Black and Latino students and those with disabilities “have fallen further behind other groups of students.” Additionally, students suffered from social-emotional loss such as stress, anxiety and loneliness during online instruction.

The decision is also partly based on the state health department reporting 1.8 million people fully vaccinated. The positivity rate, or the percentage of positive results among all coronavirus tests, sits at 4%, below the state’s threshold of 5%.

Gov. Larry Hogan, who pushed for all schools to conduct some form of in-person instruction by March 1, approved of the school board’s decision, saying the state allocated $1.2 billion for teacher vaccinations and other resources to reopen schools.

“Families and students deserve certainty that all school systems will return to full in-person learning,” the Republican governor said in a statement. To address the academic and emotional toll of prolonged online instruction, today’s vote is an important step toward getting things back to normal.”

State education records show five school systems have less than 40% of students in a school building — Baltimore City and Anne Arundel, Charles, Montgomery and Prince George’s counties.

About 38% of Baltimore County high school students are at their respective schools.

Montgomery County recorded the lowest percentage of students in schools at 19%, according to the state. However, the state’s largest jurisdiction also accounts for the second-highest number of confirmed coronavirus cases at 69,528.

The majority-Black jurisdiction of Prince George’s County has about 34% of students participating in the hybrid model, attending schools two days a week. The county continues to lead the state in coronavirus cases with more than 82,000.

School boards from those two jurisdictions are among those that haven’t reached a decision on reopening plans for the 2021-22 school year.

“I kind of figured [state officials] would have kids back in the school by then,” said Prince George’s school board member Belinda Queen. “I got my granddaughter here and she wants to go back to school. Parents were skeptical and we didn’t want to send them back.

As for the resolution, state education board member Rachel McCusker asked if the state remains in a state of emergency and whether the board could revisit the fall decision if COVID-19 data worsens in July.

“If the situation worsens and the problem grows instead of diminishes, then we would have to go back and look at it because … we will do this safely,” said board President Clarence Crawford. “I would imagine the CDC guidance and our health department guidance would be adjusted along those lines.”

William J. Ford – Washington Informer Staff Writer

I decided I wanted to become a better writer while attending Bowie State University and figured that writing for the school newspaper would help. I’m not sure how much it helped, but I enjoyed it so much I decided to keep on doing it, which I still thoroughly enjoy 20 years later. If I weren’t a journalist, I would coach youth basketball. Actually, I still play basketball, or at least try to play, once a week. My kryptonite is peanut butter. What makes me happy – seeing my son and two godchildren grow up. On the other hand, a bad call made by an official during a football or basketball game makes me throw up my hands and scream. Favorite foods include pancakes and scrambled eggs which I could eat 24-7. The strangest thing that’s ever happened to me, or more accurately the most painful, was when I was hit by a car on Lancaster Avenue in Philadelphia. If I had the power or money to change the world, I’d make sure everyone had three meals a day. And while I don’t have a motto or favorite quote, I continue to laugh which keeps me from driving myself crazy. You can reach me several ways: Twitter @jabariwill, Instagram will_iam.ford2281 or e-mail, wford@washingtoninformer.com

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