Election officials collect electronic voting machine memory cards following the Georgia primary runoff elections at a polling location in Atlanta on Tuesday, July 24, 2018. (Elijah Nouvelage/Bloomberg via Getty Images)
Election officials collect electronic voting machine memory cards following the Georgia primary runoff elections at a polling location in Atlanta on Tuesday, July 24, 2018. (Elijah Nouvelage/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Voting rights for minorities across the country are in danger because of the federal government’s apathy, the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights warns in a new report.

The report cites strict voter ID laws, closing of polling places, elimination of early voting, voting roll purges and eligibility challenges as factors affecting minorities’ voting rights.

Minorities “continue to suffer significant, and profoundly unequal, limitations on their ability to vote,” said Catherine Lhamon, chair of the commission.

Overall, 23 states have new restrictions in effect with most of them occurring in the South where the 1965 Voting Rights Act that outlawed discriminatory voting practices, according to the report released on Sept. 12.

In addition, academic studies and court cases have found that these laws affect minority voters at a higher rate than White voters.

After the 2010 election, “state lawmakers nationwide, started introducing hundreds of harsh measures making it harder to vote,” according to the Brennan Center for Justice.

WI Guest Author

This correspondent is a guest contributor to The Washington Informer.

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