Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan points as he speaks to supporters in Yola, Nigeria, Thursday, Jan. 29, 2015. Youths angry at the Nigerian government's failure to fight Islamic extremists threw stones Thursday at President Goodluck Jonathan's electioneering convoy in the eastern town of Jalingo, breaking windshields and windows on several vehicles. (AP Photo/Lekan Oyekanmi)
Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan points as he speaks to supporters in  Yola, Nigeria,   Thursday, Jan. 29, 2015. Youths angry at the Nigerian government's failure to fight Islamic extremists threw stones Thursday at President Goodluck Jonathan's electioneering convoy in the eastern town of Jalingo, breaking windshields and windows on several vehicles. (AP Photo/Lekan Oyekanmi)
Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan points as he speaks to supporters in Yola, Nigeria, Thursday, Jan. 29, 2015. (AP Photo/Lekan Oyekanmi)

(BBC) – With presidential polls on 14 February, it is clear that some of the potential voters residing in the troubled north-east of Nigeria will not be able to cast their vote, in an election that some analysts say is too close to call.

With 20 of the 27 local government areas of Borno state, the epicentre of the Boko Haram insurgency, under the control of the Islamist insurgents, it will be difficult if not impossible for voting to take place in those areas.

The militants have also made more limited forays into parts of Yobe and Adamawa states – and they now control more than 20,000 sq km (7,722 sq miles) of territory.

However, the governor of Borno is adamant that this is no reason to postpone the elections.

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