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Police Rethink Long Tradition on Using Force

Police in riot gear line up near the scene of Monday's riots ahead of a 10 p.m. curfew Wednesday, April 29, 2015, in Baltimore. The curfew was imposed after unrest in Baltimore over the death of Freddie Gray while in police custody. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Police in riot gear line up near the scene of Monday’s riots ahead of a 10 p.m. curfew Wednesday, April 29, 2015, in Baltimore. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

WASHINGTON (New York Times) — During a training course on defending against knife attacks, a young Salt Lake City police officer asked a question: “How close can somebody get to me before I’m justified in using deadly force?”

Dennis Tueller, the instructor in that class more than three decades ago, decided to find out. In the fall of 1982, he performed a rudimentary series of tests and concluded that an armed attacker who bolted toward an officer could clear 21 feet in the time it took most officers to draw, aim and fire their weapon.

The next spring, Mr. Tueller published his findings in SWAT magazine and transformed police training in the United States. The “21-foot rule” became dogma. It has been taught in police academies around the country, accepted by courts and cited by officers to justify countless shootings, including recent episodes involving a homeless woodcarver in Seattle and a schizophrenic woman in San Francisco.

Now, amid the largest national debate over policing since the 1991 beating of Rodney King in Los Angeles, a small but vocal set of law enforcement officials are calling for a rethinking of the 21-foot rule and other axioms that have emphasized how to use force, not how to avoid it. Several big-city police departments are already re-examining when officers should chase people or draw their guns and when they should back away, wait or try to defuse the situation.

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