Maryland Democrat and gubernatorial candidate Wes Moore, right, walks with Prince George’s County Executive Angela Alsobrooks on Election Day on July 19 outside Potomac Landing Elementary School in Fort Washington. (William J. Ford/The Washington Informer)
Maryland Democrat and gubernatorial candidate Wes Moore, right, walks with Prince George’s County Executive Angela Alsobrooks on Election Day on July 19 outside Potomac Landing Elementary School in Fort Washington. (William J. Ford/The Washington Informer)

After eight days of early voting in Maryland, it’s finally Election Day.

Tuesday’s primary election didn’t go well for some voters in Prince George’s County because two polling sites in Cheverly and Clinton slated to open at 7 a.m. didn’t do so until 8:30 a.m.

Maryland Democrat and gubernatorial candidate Peter Franchot walks toward a polling location at Piney Branch Elementary School in Takoma Park on Election Day on July 19. (Robert R. Roberts/The Washington Informer)

Sherman Hardy, one of four Democrats challenging County Executive Angela Alsobrooks in this year’s election, cast his ballot at Clinton Grove Elementary. He said in a text message any election problems must be corrected before the upcoming November general election.

“I don’t understand how this happened being that we just completed early voting,” Hardy said in a text message. “Hopefully it wasn’t widespread. We shouldn’t take these missteps lightly.”

Maryland Democrat and gubernatorial candidate John King Jr. completes his ballot on Election Day on July 19 at the East Silver Spring Elementary School. (Robert R. Roberts/The Washington Informer)

A county election official said in an email Tuesday the main reason stems from lack of election workers. In addition, some new people aren’t familiar with setting up election equipment that caused a delay for residents to vote in Clinton and Cheverly.

An election official explained to voters calmly standing in line at the Judith P. Hoyer Early Childhood Center in Cheverly that if they needed to vote immediately, they could travel to another voting precinct in the town and fill out a provisional ballot.

Maryland Democrat and gubernatorial candidate John King Jr. celebrates with his wife and their two daughters after voting on Election Day on July 19. King’s daughter, Amina (second from right), voted for the first time. (Robert R. Roberts/The Washington Informer)

“We can tell some stories while waiting in line,” former county State’s Attorney Glenn Ivey said amongst some laughs with other voters.

His name appears on ballots in parts of Prince George’s and Montgomery counties to seek the Democratic nomination for the 4th Congressional District.

The seat became open after Rep. Anthony Brown (D-Maryland) chose to run for attorney general.

Former Prince George’s County State’s Attorney Glenn Ivey (right) chats with a couple of voters as they wait to go inside to vote on July 19 at the Judith P. Hoyer Early Childhood Center in Cheverly. (William J. Ford/The Washington Informer)

Ivey’s in a contested battle with eight other Democrats, including former Rep. Donna Edwards.

Edwards and Ivey received most of the attention with television campaign ads that attacked each other’s credibility from two pro-Israel groups.

The American Israel Public Affairs Committee, known as AIPAC, provided more than half of Ivey’s $1.2 million campaign which included an ad that alleges Edwards’ lack of constituent services during her time in Congress.

Former Rep. Donna Edwards (left) chats with Diane Young before she casts her vote for Edwards on July 19 at the Breath of Life Seventh-day Adventist Church in Fort Washington. (William J. Ford/The Washington Informer)

J Street, a more liberal group that denounced the AIPAC ads, released an ad last week on behalf of Edwards that alleges Ivey’s support of AIPAC also back some Republicans who voted to overturn the 2020 election.

Phyllis Wright and Diane Young praised Ivey’s work as state’s attorney, one reason why Wright voted for him.

“It was a tough choice, but I went with Glenn Ivey,” Wright said after she voted at Concord Elementary in District Heights.

However, Young, who voted at the Breath of Life Seventh-day Adventist Church in Fort Washington, chose Edwards because she didn’t approve of the “negative ads” that really had no meaning, especially against a Black woman.”

Maryland voters still have time to cast ballots in the races for governor, attorney general, comptroller and other state and local races before polls close at 8 p.m.

Coverage for the Washington Informer includes Prince George’s County government, school system and some state of Maryland government. Received an award in 2019 from the D.C. Chapter of the Society of...

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