A man walks past an election poster of Jacob Zuma's African National Congress (ANC) party in the Soweto township of Johannesburg, South Africa, on Friday, May 9, 2014. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)
A man walks past an election poster of Jacob Zuma's African National Congress (ANC) party in the Soweto township of Johannesburg, South Africa, on Friday, May 9, 2014. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)
A man walks past an election poster of Jacob Zuma’s African National Congress (ANC) party in the Soweto township of Johannesburg, South Africa, on Friday, May 9, 2014. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)

(Reuters) – South Africa’s government has built close to 4 million houses for low-income families since the end of apartheid in 1994.

Lizzie Mboweni is one of millions still waiting for one.

Last Saturday she joined scores of squatters from Diepsloot, a shantytown north of Johannesburg, in a violent attempt to grab plots in an unused field across the road, part of a campaign of land invasions launched by the Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF), an ultra-left opposition party.

The frustration of millions of impoverished black South Africans like Mboweni is not lost on the ruling African National Congress (ANC), which is resorting to brute force to thwart the invasions while signaling a populist shift to the left on land.

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