Members of Prince George's County House delegation hold a public session at Prince George's Community College on Dec. 11 to discuss proposed legislation for the upcoming Maryland General Assembly. (William J. Ford/The Washington Informer)
Members of Prince George's County House delegation hold a public session at Prince George's Community College on Dec. 11 to discuss proposed legislation for the upcoming Maryland General Assembly. (William J. Ford/The Washington Informer)

Similar to the installation of speed cameras along Route 210 in Fort Washington, more are proposed in other parts of Prince George’s County.

Businesses in the jurisdiction could be imposed with a 5 cent fee for the sale of disposable plastic and paper bags.

These are two pieces of proposed legislation state lawmakers which represent the county plan to present when the Maryland General Assembly convenes Jan. 8 in Annapolis.

Although public school education will be the most high-profile topic based on recommendations from the Commission on Innovation and Excellence in Education, also known as the Kirwan Commission, lawmakers hope that isn’t sought to solve all problems.

“Let’s not use the Kirwan Commission as a vehicle to do everything,” said Del. Alonzo Washington (D-District 22) of Greenbelt.

Washington and others from the county’s House delegation discussed possible legislation that could be reviewed during the 90-day session that would only affect Prince George’s.

Lawmakers earlier this year approved installing no more than three speed cameras, formally known as speed monitoring systems, along Route 210, a highway designated as one of the most dangerous highways in the state.

Two more sets are proposed in areas some say are just as dangerous: along Croom Road between Mount Calver and Molly Berry roads in Upper Marlboro and on Church Road between Old Stage Road and Dunwood Valley Drive in Bowie.

In June, police said a 14-year-old boy was fatally struck by a vehicle at intersection of Church Road and Fairview Vista Drive. Six delegates are sponsoring the legislation on behalf of the delegation, according to a bill summary.

“It’s a tool to give Prince George’s County [and] for us to address, particularly traffic issues,” Prince George’s County Council Chair Todd Turner said in support of the cameras along Church Road. “We lead the state in some of those categories and we are trying to address those issues.”

Del. Jay Walker (D-District 24) of Fort Washington asked about certain statistics to determine whether speed cameras are needed, such as traffic congestion and number of vehicular and pedestrian accidents.

“I wasn’t a big fan of speed cameras,” he said. “However, one thing I’ve learned about speed cameras. They do make people slow down, but what are the numbers [to back it up]?”

“A young kid was killed on that street and that was enough for me,” said County Council Vice Chair Calvin Hawkins II.

Meanwhile, the county could join other jurisdictions such as Montgomery County to implement a 5 cent levy on disposable bags.

According to the legislation, money generated would go toward to provide reusable bags for residents, litter cleanup activities and other resources.

If approved, it would take effect in October 2020.

Coverage for the Washington Informer includes Prince George’s County government, school system and some state of Maryland government. Received an award in 2019 from the D.C. Chapter of the Society of...

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