Mourners carry the coffin of a victim of violence before his burial in the Shiite holy city of Najaf, 100 miles (160 kilometers) south of Baghdad, Iraq, Tuesday, July 1, 2014. Violence has claimed the lives of 2,417 Iraqis in June, making it the deadliest month so far this year, the United Nations said on Tuesday, underlining the daunting challenge the government faces as it struggles to confront Islamic extremists who have seized large swaths of territory in the north and west. Arabic on the coffin reads, "they stood for the late Mohammed Mosawel." (AP Photo/Jaber al-Helo)
Mourners carry the coffin of a victim of violence before his burial in the Shiite holy city of Najaf, 100 miles (160 kilometers) south of Baghdad, Iraq, Tuesday, July 1, 2014. Violence has claimed the lives of 2,417 Iraqis in June, making it the deadliest month so far this year, the United Nations said on Tuesday, underlining the daunting challenge the government faces as it struggles to confront Islamic extremists who have seized large swaths of territory in the north and west. Arabic on the coffin reads, "they stood for the late Mohammed Mosawel." (AP Photo/Jaber al-Helo)
Mourners carry the coffin of a victim of violence before his burial in the Shiite holy city of Najaf, 100 miles (160 kilometers) south of Baghdad, Iraq, Tuesday, July 1, 2014. (AP Photo/Jaber al-Helo)

(The Washington Post) – In a new study released Tuesday, the Pew Global Attitudes Project found that “concern about Islamic extremism is high among countries with substantial Muslim populations.” This comes at a particularly fraught moment in the Middle East: the jihadist militant group Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) has seized whole swaths of territory in Iraq and Syria and proclaimed a new caliphate.

The study involved over 14,000 respondents in 14 countries and was conducted between April and May — before ISIS’s dramatic advance through Iraq this past month. But it underscores the growing fear and anger felt by many in Muslim-majority countries when facing a range of militant threats, from that of Boko Haram in Nigeria to ISIS to the Taliban insurgency in Pakistan.

Fear about terrorism has spiked in a host of countries, most conspicuously Lebanon, which has watched the spillover of Syria’s brutal civil war rekindle longstanding sectarian tensions at home. Syrian refugees now make up a quarter of Lebanon’s population.

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