Courtesy photo
Courtesy photo

Now more than ever, there are digital platforms to learn, research and explore the different facets of Black life.

From the antebellum days to the millennium, photos, videos, artifacts and oral history capture Black Americans’ various expressions and stories now digitized for public consumption.

Here are three archives to consider as you take a deeper dive into this Black History Month.

Black Film Archive

Created by Maya S. Cade, a Howard University alum, Black Film Archive is a living register of Black films. In its current iteration, it showcases Black films made from 1915 to 1979 currently streaming.

For Black History Month, the archive has curated 28 films for 28 days to chart Black contributions to cinematic history.

“This selection is a place to start, find yourself in, retreat to, and rediscover gems,” said Black Film Archive.

Black Beauty Archives

Curated from the hearts and minds of Black women, Black Beauty Archives encompasses the history of the past and documents the present while imagining the future.

Collections and objects include rare vintage beauty ads, magazines, press photos, stamps, cosmetics, wigs and beauty tools. 

In addition, exclusive oral histories from beauty professionals and historians are added to their collection on a bimonthly basis.

“Our mission is to preserve, document and celebrate the history of Black Beauty culture,” said Black Beauty Archives.

Black Archives

Founded in 2015 by Renata Cherlise, Black Archives serves as a multimedia platform that brings a spotlight to the Black experience.

Through an evolving visual exploration, Black Archives provides accessibility to a Black past, present and future.

“Going beyond the norm, its lens examines the nuance of Black life: alive and ever-vibrant to both the everyday and iconic — providing insight and inspiration to those seeking to understand the legacies that preceded their own,” said Black Archives.

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