The neighborhood of Barry Farm at the intersection of Eaton Road and Firth Sterling Avenue in southeast D.C. is seen here. (Courtesy of Eric T. Gunther via Wikimedia Commons)
**FILE** The neighborhood of Barry Farm at the intersection of Eaton Road and Firth Sterling Avenue in southeast D.C. is seen here. (Courtesy of Eric T. Gunther via Wikimedia Commons)

The Smithsonian Institution’s Anacostia Community Museum in Ward 8 has a new online exhibit on the Barry Farm-Hillsdale neighborhood and its role in the fight for civil rights.

The exhibit, “We Shall Not Be Moved: Stories of Struggle from Barry Farm-Hillsdale,” serves as a part of a yearlong emphasis on housing equity and justice in the District, WTOP reported. The exhibit can be viewed on the museum’s website through the end of the year.

Barry Farm-Hillsdale was created after the Civil War as an area for Blacks. The neighborhood became a thriving Black enclave that contained churches, schools, civic organizations, and residents such as the son of 19th-century civil rights leader and Anacostia resident Frederick Douglass.

“It developed into a strong African American community that was very active in several very important events in Washington,” said curator Alcione Amos, who authored the book “Barry Farm-Hillsdale in Anacostia: A Historic African American Community,” WTOP reported.

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