Dr. Regina Hampton, a general surgeon at Doctors Community Hospital, and Victorianne Russell Walton of It's in the Genes pumps up the crowd at a P.I.N.K.I.E. party for Breast Cancer Awareness Month in Lanham, Maryland, in October. (Courtesy of Doctors Community Hospital)
Dr. Regina Hampton, a general surgeon at Doctors Community Hospital, and Victorianne Russell Walton of It's in the Genes pumps up the crowd at a P.I.N.K.I.E. party for Breast Cancer Awareness Month in Lanham, Maryland, in October. (Courtesy of Doctors Community Hospital)

Doctors Community Hospital in Lanham, Maryland, held two free P.I.N.K.I.E. (Purposely Involved N Keeping Individuals Educated) parties to educate employees and community members about breast health as well as the importance of annual mammogram screenings and clinical breast examinations.

During the month of October, which serves as Breast Cancer Awareness Month, hospital leaders wanted to make sure women in the surrounding communities are focusing on their health.

“We hear from some women who state that they are more focused on ensuring that their loved ones receive regular health screenings, however, that same level of emphasis is not always given to maintaining their own personal health,” Terrie Trimmer, director of Center for Comprehensive Breast Care at Doctors Community Hospital, said.

“When combined with access barriers and screening anxieties, many are not getting this and other preventative health services,” she said. “That’s why the P.I.N.K.I.E. party and other types of community outreach initiatives are so important in improving people’s health or saving lives.”

The experts at the Doctors Community Hospital recommend women receive regular screening mammograms to help detect breast cancer early – when it’s most treatable.

Also, women ages 40 and up should have a clinical breast exam and mammogram yearly.

Breast cancer, a disease in which malignant cancerous cells develop in breast tissue, even in early stages does not always have symptoms. Some may develop as the tumor grows.

Symptoms include a painless lump in or near the breasts, change in breast size or firmness, nipple discomfort including discharge and swelling in the armpit.

The hospital partnered with It’s in the Genes – a health advocacy organization dedicated to advancing breast cancer awareness – to assist with the two October events.

“The atmosphere for these events is one of fun, health education and more fun!” Victorianne Russell Walton, founder of It’s In the Genes, said.

Along with community members receiving massages, manicures and health education, they received the opportunity to also get their annual screening mammograms and clinical breast examinations.

“This combination is often successful in our connecting with many women – even some who have never had a mammogram or received their last screening many years ago.”

Sarafina Wright –Washington Informer Staff Writer

Sarafina Wright is a staff writer at the Washington Informer where she covers business, community events, education, health and politics. She also serves as the editor-in-chief of the WI Bridge, the Informer’s...

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