US Attorney Loretta Lynch, center, looks to Attorney General Eric Holder as with President Barack Obama at right, in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington, Saturday, Nov. 8, 2014, where the president announced that he will nominate Lynch to replace Holder as Attorney General. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
US Attorney Loretta Lynch, center, looks to Attorney General Eric Holder as with President Barack Obama at right, in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington, Saturday, Nov. 8, 2014, where the president announced that he will nominate Lynch to replace Holder as Attorney General. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
US Attorney Loretta Lynch, center, looks to Attorney General Eric Holder as with President Barack Obama at right, in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington, Saturday, Nov. 8, 2014, where the president announced that he will nominate Lynch to replace Holder as Attorney General. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

WASHINGTON (New York Times) — Loretta E. Lynch on Wednesday will cast herself as an apolitical career prosecutor who is a departure from Eric H. Holder Jr. when she faces a new Republican-controlled Judiciary Committee that includes some of the administration’s fiercest critics in Congress.

If she is confirmed, Ms. Lynch would be the nation’s first African-American woman to serve as attorney general. Her allies have sought to differentiate her from Mr. Holder, an outspoken liberal voice in the administration who clashed frequently with Republicans who accused him of politicizing the office.

In particular, Ms. Lynch is expected to face tough questioning about her opinion of the president’s decision to unilaterally ease the threat of deportation for millions of unauthorized immigrants. Mr. Holder approved the legal justification for that action, enraging some Republicans.

Ms. Lynch, the United States attorney in Brooklyn, will say that while she had no role in compiling the justification for the president’s action, the legal underpinning was reasonable, according to officials involved in her preparation. Anticipating queries about executive overreach, Ms. Lynch is prepared to say she would treat the Constitution as her “lodestar” in advising the president, the officials said.

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