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The Black Breast Cancer Alliance and Breastcancer.org said they will launch a new movement dedicated to empowering and educating Black women on the importance of clinical trial participation.

The When We Tri(al) movement aims to change the devastating breast cancer mortality rates for Black women who now stand at 41% more likely to die from breast cancer than white women.

“Black Breast Cancer isn’t about a month, it’s about a movement. When We Tri(al) aspires not only to save Black lives but to also educate and motivate clinical trial participation among our Black Breasties,” said Ricki Fairley, CEO of TOUCH, The Black Breast Cancer Alliance.  

“The current drugs are not working hard enough for Black women. I’m on a mission to empower our community with the necessary knowledge to advocate for ourselves within a medical system that too often fails us. We must advance the science. Our When We Tri(al) launch will serve as a moment to hear firsthand how clinical trials can change the game for breast cancer and Black women.”

Black women are drastically underrepresented in clinical trials; only 3% of clinical trial participants leading to FDA approval of cancer drugs between 2008 and 2018 were Black. 

The consequences are dire: Black women miss access to newly emerging and often life-extending treatments. 

Until more Black women are included in the research, they will continue to face worse breast cancer outcomes, Fairley said. When We Tri(al) remains focused on the urgent need to end these disparities.

When We Tri(al) will provide essential tools and information for Black women to confidently take an active role in their care and seek out clinical trial opportunities that could be life-changing,” said Hope Wohl, CEO of Breastcancer.org. 

“Breastcancer.org is committed to eliminating barriers to health equity including coming together with our advocacy partners to improve representation in research,” Wohl said. “The When We Tri(al) launch is an exciting start to a movement that will lead to crucial change.”

Go to www.whenwetrial.org to learn more.

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Sarafina Wright –Washington Informer Staff Writer

Sarafina Wright is a staff writer at the Washington Informer where she covers business, community events, education, health and politics. She also serves as the editor-in-chief of the WI Bridge, the Informer’s...

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