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The Pernicious Civil War Revisionism Poisoning American History Students

Confederate flags are planted next to the graves of Confederate soldiers in Oakland cemetery, Monday, April 22, 2013, in Atlanta. Georgia observes Confederate Memorial Day Monday marking the anniversary of the end of the Civil War. While April 26th is officially recognized as Confederate Memorial Day, state offices are closed Monday in observance of the holiday. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Confederate flags are planted next to the graves of Confederate soldiers in Oakland cemetery, Monday, April 22, 2013, in Atlanta. Georgia observes Confederate Memorial Day Monday marking the anniversary of the end of the Civil War. While April 26th is officially recognized as Confederate Memorial Day, state offices are closed Monday in observance of the holiday. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

(Salon) – No living historian has done more to shape our understanding of the American Civil War era than Eric Foner. A rare scholar who is both prominent outside the historical community and esteemed within it, over the course of a fifty-year career Foner has acquired virtually every award, tribute, and professional honor available to a historian in the United States.

Yet the true measure of his legacy lies not in accolades but influence. Foner’s most important books have transformed the way we see — and the way we teach — the origins of the Civil War, the significance of slave emancipation, and the politics of postwar Reconstruction.

Foner grew up in a New York family equally devoted to historical scholarship and left-wing politics. His father, Jack, and his uncle, Philip, both taught history at City College before they were dismissed and blacklisted as Communists.

For the elder Foners, a radical approach to US history involved placing the black freedom struggle at center stage. “In the 1930s,” Eric later wrote, “the Communist party was the only predominantly white organization to make fighting racism central to its political program.” It was no coincidence that the family was friendly with W. E. B. Du Bois and Paul Robeson, or that Philip Foner’s five-volume selection of Frederick Douglass’s writings and speeches, which he completed while on the blacklist, was the first collected edition of its kind.

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